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Startups, here are few tips to seek reader’s attention via emails

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Did you ever stumble upon a situation where you wanted to get attention of someone valuable, like HR manager of some company, or a journalist, maybe? Like for a situation where you’ve got a business opportunity that is beneficial for you and your company and that “potential customer” someone, as well?

You are convinced that you’ve got to win the client’s attention. But that people are too busy to open emails from unknown sources, right? The answer to “why” is simple; there would be other hundreds of other e-mails in his inbox trying to get their attention.

Will someone open your email? Yes. No. Yes. No. Yes or No?

How about increasing your chances of “Yes”?

You can gather some handy tips here to help you go with the “trying-to-get-attention” emails.

A catchy phrase or sentence for the subject

Among the hundreds of mails in their inbox, your email must stand out, and the easiest way? The subject line, of course! Only 50 characters stand between email success and the trash bin. Is it relevant and interesting? If not, it’s likely your email won’t make it. A crazy, catchy subject will do, but it also needs to be specific of what the email is regarding.

A little tip: Exclamation marks!!! or ALL CAPS won’t make it interesting.

 A one – sentence introduction

Or maybe two but a lengthy introduction of yourself/your company won’t earn you any points and your email may go to spam instead.

Be short and to the point, stating benefits for them

Your reader is more likely to become engaged in your announcement if you can keep the message brief and direct. And explain why your message is important or how it will benefit them, but briefly, 6-7 sentences and you are done. Everyone always needs to know what’s in it for them without wasting much time.

Your email should always have a “call to action” making it clear what you want the recipient to do.

Another little tip: Don’t ask for a favour outright, especially not for the first time.

 Do your homework

Do the prior research about your readers, their networks, interests and the goals. This is an ideal rule for reaching out to anybody (to show you value their time), but it’s especially important when reaching out to busy people.

Don’t act like some freaky lover, but keep in touch

People don’t like to be annoyed by emails, but it is important to keep in touch and further the relationship. Act like a peer with a good proposal, and you’ll find you’ll get replied to like one. Follow up and stay interested.

There’s this guy who wants to launch a podcast and he needed influential people for discussion for an hour or so. The people he was emailing were known for selling hundreds of thousands of books, getting cited in every major newspaper and academic journal and more.

How did he get them to join on the launch of his podcast?

He made it all about them. Even though they would be helping him by appearing, his email was all about how he could help them. Here’s an example of an email he used:

Just got done reading your new book, and that story [insert specific example], just made sense. That said, I’m launching a new podcast, and would love to feature you and your new book. I suspect we’ll be able to sell a few hundred copies from just this interview.

Here’s the deal: I run a marketing / human behaviour blog at [His blog name]. I’ve got 13,000 RSS readers, 10,000 people on an email list, and I get about 100,000 hits each month.

And since my blog is all about buyer psychology and marketing, your book is truly a perfect match.

If you’re interested, let me know and we can figure out the timing.

The email starts with complimenting the reader, one-line introduction of himself, keeping the context to point, stating the benefits for the reader and ending it with “call to action”.

With these few basic tips in mind, I hope your email seeks attention just as you want it to!

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